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20130318
20130326
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
romney candidacy so it would have slowed them down. but for some voters out there this just might have been a dream that was too good to be true. >> that i will faithfully execute -- >> what if president obama had faced him and him in last year's election? who would be living here? during the republican primary, rick santorum and newt gingrich just couldn't see eye to eye and they trained their sights on each other. >> at times you just sort of, you know, that worrisome moment that something is going to pop and we can't afford that in a nominee. >> i think long before rick came to congress i was busy being a rebel. those are just historic facts even if they're inconvenient for rick's campaign. >> reporter: but soon they stopped snipping at each other and started sniping at romney. before long, both men had dealt serious blows to the front-runner. santorum with the surprise squeaker in iowa followed by a gingrich win in south carolina. suddenly, mitt romney was on the ropes. a gingrich adviser went to the santorum camp. would the senator join the speaker on one ticket? no. santorum was
carolina and rick perry in texas and ideally maybe even governor romney in massachusetts. they deal across the aisle and they deal with prak cal issues and they can help the party sort of see where the country's going and move ahead in a practical matter and take credit for it if the party is smart enough to take advantage of that. >> practicality, bipartisan thinking and nonideological thinking is the reason why people liked republican governors so easily. they don't like to make a big ideological choice and giving a reasonable bipartisan, non-ideological answer. i haven't thought much about it and it sounds fine to me. it's a reasonable answer as a gi that doesn't give much thought to something and even if you're a governor. here's another example, on monday morning at a press conference to review the rnc's 2012 autopsy, the chairman of the party reince priebus had kind words for senator rob portman who came out in favor of gay marriage. let's listen. >> how do you rein in the anti-gay and anti-women sentiments and bring these voters into the fold and who in the political arena do you th
voters who supported president clinton -- sorry, president obama, over mitt romney by margin of 24 percentage points? >> i don't know that it does help or doesn't help. what i first have to get clear is what is libertarian conservatism? the two don't seem to mesh for me. you're talking about someone who is certainly against marriage equality but every libertarian, true libertarian i know wants to stay out of my life, and every social conservative i know wants to be in my life. i'm not really sure about the difference here. we're still talking about a guy who disagrees with the lions share of the civil rights legislation rulings of the '60s because he said they infringed on personal property rights. so i've got real dilemmas with rand paul and some of those issues that i think might play better with younger audiences. and i just don't see how he plays well. >> hogan, another republican senator making waves right now, another tea party darling is ted cruz of texas. in an interview over the weekend he said his biggest surprise of the senate has been the "defeatist attitude of many rep
successful and mitt romney was elected they would have gotten their way. neil: but, it is they might get their way wit president behind them. but declines numbers, might make it difficult even with the president. >> no question, righto work, and end of collective bargaining is bad for unions and workers. you have republican governors, like chris christie, who is supportive of private sector unions and collective bargaining, it is not the end of the world, but,hey will support a man who standing by their agenda, that is the way it works in washinnton. it works other way. so, you know, unions -- >> i don't know that they would have needed to getting any. a lot of folks watching this, say, i see they are in trouble in washington having a heck of a time since last year in wisconsin, losing out on some big state cutbacks even in california and what is going on across pretty were the southeast. so, they beg to feel like custer? >> i think for most part, you have to think about president obama's second term agenda, which you know, parts of it may affect the unions, but he is focused on gun cont
-ended the republican primary might even have produced a different nominee. as mitt romney struggled in the weeks leading up to the michigan primary, newt gingrich and rick santorum nearly agreed to form a joint unity ticket to consolidate conservative support and topple romney. we were close, former representative bob walker, a grich ally says. grich a gingrich and an toreum couldn't agree. in the end gingrich told me too hard to negotiate. so much going on there! where do i start? >> like i said this is one of the great untold stories. >> that is hilarious. >> how would that have worked? i'm curious. >> it didn't! >> i'm asking this question seriously because -- >> that is the point. >> because back in 2008, the reason why mike huckabee got beaten by john mccain is because fred thompson and john mccain struck this same deal and made the difference in south carolina. how is this going to work? >> first important to situate ourselves to february when this happened in the gop primary. romney was really struggling and clear he had a tough time winning his home state. there was emerging anybody but
of massage the message. example, if you talk to naacp like mitt romney did in 2012, you don't do this. >> i'll eliminate every nonessential expensive program i can find and that includes obama care and i'm going to work to -- >> joining me now, democratic strategist robert zimmerman and cnn contributor anna nevaro. thank you for being with us. i want to go back to that event at naacp in 2012. >> why, carol? >> i was intrigued with the new massaging of the message. i thought we were friends. >> i'm sorry. i have to ask you this. how could mitt romney have better put that and make the audience a little more receptive to what he had to say? >> carol, mitt romney who? look, he's yesterday's news. he's not the candidate anymore. he himself has acknowledged there were a bunch of mistakes made by his campaign. he's not the one setting policy. he's not the one setting the tone for the republican party now. i think what we should talk about is what the rnc did today. they appointed some very no nonsense pragmatic people including our colleague ari fleischer from cnn and also sally bradshaw among the
going to happen? do you see seiu endorsing mitt romney? >> not mitt romney. he's history. but the fact of the matter is, if the republican party wants to broaden itself out, going forward, they will choose canned -- candidates and issues that attract labor -- >> we have the very best! we have the very best issues about labor, we want to lower the taxes on working people and more liberty for working people. we want to protect america's borders and from terrorism for working people -- [overlapping dialogue] >> that has nothing to do with what we are talking about. >> we are not talking about the borders. you are conflating a burch of stuff that has nothing to do with unions itch the idea that working people is union membership is a fraud. working people need job creation. and conservative approximatelies will bring t. liberal policies will crush it -- [overlapping dialogue] >> that's proven to be untrue. >> shannon: gentlemen. we talked about the numbers. neap 1953, it is peak for union membership here. 26% of the labor force. now it's 11.3. if the unions are vital and so powerful, why t
candidate for a candid camera world. mitt romney had a lot of problems just being videoed, being himself. it was worse than the other problems he had which was not being himself. neither worked out very well. and chris christie does this thing, when he talks off the cuff. to kids or teachers or yelling at reporters, people love it. if you look on youtube at the viral videos, and he has created several. eight of the top ten are him being spontaneous. you can see, he says it is reprehensible. this is the crap i have to hear. >> how my uncle talk. >> what the hell are we paying you for? get the hell off the beach. i don't think it is a great way for a governor to address his constituents and i think he has used an outsized personality to actually distract from a very anti-worker platform so there are a lot of problem with chris christie. if we're optics, youtube, campaigning for a republican party that doesn't look good when it says what it thinks, he is better than most. >> he has pretty good approval ratings. >> rand is the intellectual side of the party which has a lot of truth to it but
they go out and talk to people, they are treated so badly. like romney went to philadelphia and got heckleed. when you look at the twitter feed, how badly was he? you have professors that are incompetent and that is the only thing you can do. this goes back to what dennis prager said, the right thinks the left is wrong, but the left thinks the right is evil. that excuses the dehumanizing behavior. the behavior that allows you to denigrate a surgeon. by the way, why are all surgeons conservatives? what is it about that? do they understand, younow, logic -- >> dana: logic and fact. >> greg: rapid paul, ophthalmologist, not a surgeon. ophthalmologists performs surgery. >> dana: they could. >> greg: case closed. >> eric: move to future of the g.o.p. >> kimberly: let's do it. >> dana: so bright you have to wear shades. >> eric: me and a lot of conservatives scratching our head as they talk about rebanding the party, because it's perceived as "stufffy old men" and needs to change its ways. we had thoughts on the g.o.p. rush limbaugh. listen. >> the republicans are totally bamboozled and l
's not conservative. it didn't get its base out in the 2012 election. >> rush is putting the blame on mitt romney who suddenly became a severe conservative after being a moderate republican. let's look at true conservatives in the running for president in 2012. rick santorum, newt gingrich and rick perry. all three made an appearance at cpac. the influential conservative gathering, we believe these are true conservatives. would any of those true conservatives really have beaten barack obama? amy? >> carol, i don't think anybody would beat barack obama. he's a pop culture icon, and he's captain to that generation that all they care about is pop culture. when rush is talking about people being conservative, he's not talking about social issues i don't think. he's talking about somebody fiscally conservative. i come from a red state and i didn't think mitt romney's conservative enough for me, he is for his state. it's all relative. that's what he's talking about. >> maria. >> agree with amy. i don't think that any of the other candidates would have beaten president obama. now, i do agree with rush that
people, tax breaks which mitt romney and paul ryan talked been on the campaign trail. >> neil: they were without raising the overall rate. now we have the rates raised. so republicans talk of a need for a trigger. they might go along with this tax break stuff and all their closing the loopholes, that they did agree it's sort of wasting time and money and the tax code, but you guys have then got to, as part of the trigger, agree simultaneously to these cuts you talked about. what do you make of that? >> well, first of all, the difference is republicans have never said they're willing to close some of those tax loopholes for the purpose of reducing the deficit. which is what the bipartisan -- >> neil: i got a couple on you. i suspect no angel in the ranks of either party. but they did say that they would be open to closing these loopholes but without this being the only negotiating point on the part of democrats. not more taxes but this time you have to put up -- your party has to put up specific cuts, and they both go off at the same time. >> well, i couldn't -- we can certainly try to de
's development, though, is fascinating. >> it is. i wonder if it played a role in his -- in mitt romney's campaign. i think it might have. >>> next week, the supreme court will consider a challenge to laws that outlaw same-sex marriage. >> actually, i don't think it did. i don't think the romney team wanted to win ohio. >> the woman running -- >> if they'd selected rob portman, they'd win ohio. who wants to win ohio? >> just 1 of 50. >> too constructive. >> ran this selection process, not only said it didn't play a role, but she herself has come out in support of gay marriage. >> who? >> beth myers who ran the selection process. >> but she didn't make the decisions, ran the process. >> she was influential. >> all right. >>> coming up on "morning joe." i'm just telling you -- >> what are you telling us? >> shortsightedness ran that campaign and that would have been it. >> and where can i meet them? >> he's over there with samsung. the end of power players, how the little guys are making waves on the global stage. so let's break down this play. charles? uh, charles couldn't make it. his s
not understand what people think we have such a contentious relationship. on the rear of a car, a mitt romney bumper sticker. guest: it is no secret that he had a tense relationship with president obama. even though they will deny it, it was clear that he was close to mitt romney and so said that he supported mitt romney. he definitely did not do much to support obama in this re- election cycle. however these three short days in the middle east have done a lot to bridge these gaps. we saw benjamin netanyahu willing to be persuaded by president obama. i think we saw the israeli public, even though it may have started out with a deep mistrust towards obama, it ended this week with a lot of affection. maybe it did manage to bridge some of these gaps. ,ost: after a two state evening he arrived on wednesday, meeting with the israeli prime minister. thursday he traveled to the west bank and met with the palestinian authority president. friday, meeting with the king of playing tourist yesterday and returning to washington at 8:00 last evening. the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, asked ab
on to the general elechblgs i tell you that is a river of red down there, where romney won that district by 18%. so -- >> a river of red? >> a great candidate. but at the end of the day. we are going to find out whether that moral comp nas got high wire, all right republican party around base continue to overlook that? >> i can't think of a democratic candidate who had the nerve to go ask his ex-wife to run his campaign. >> that's true. that's different kind of gutsy. i'm saying gutsy, because i'm on cable in the afternoon. not premium. a different kind of gutsy. >> the democratic candidate contributed to mark sanford in the past. this is really going to be a dicy one if he is successful next tuesday a week. >> stay in the south here for second. kentuckiens in the spotlight once again. this week, senator rand paul's rise to gop fame and of course, ashley judd. according to abc news here, judd apparently has the support of former president bill clinton. and news reported friday that bill clinton encouraged judd to e he were the race and promised he would help her. the report said former president cl
worked with mitt romney's campaign, vice president of target point consulting. let me first say it is a treat to have you both here for me. i'm thrilled. >> great to be here. >> it's a fascinating topic. let me start by showing some nbc wall street journal numbers to talk about the trend. so in 2004, the question was asked, do you favor or oppose same-sex marriage. 30% favor, 62% oppose. today, eight and a half years later, 51% favor, 40% oppose. let me start with you. the trend seems quite clear. am i missing something? i want to make sure we're painting the whole picture. >> no, you're not missing anything. it's a pretty spectacular time to be a student of public opinion. because we're in the midst of one of the most profound public opinion shifts in history right now. everything is moving up. >> and what do you do, joel? you've -- i mean, look, you and i have had many conversations about the data and what's good and bad. but i would say that broadly what it looks like here is all the polling suggests things moving in a certain direction. what explains when something moves lik
for mitt romney very much opposed to gay marriage. we have seen rob say he is for gay marriage. the shift in this country has been so dramatic and strong on this, we are seeing ceos, hillary clinton, republican senators, republican members of congress, ken melman, ex-republican chair, talked about gay marriage and opposition now being for gay marriage. the court can't ignore how strong the movement in the country, pretty much everyone below 30 is for gay marriage. hard to imagine they'll buck those trends and somehow come against gay marriage. >> it brings me back to the original premise, whether or not some of these folks, whether with their money or megaphone have an opportunity to really influence the conversation, one lone individual, and i am thinking in this case about mark zuckerberg who we mentioned at the top. he has a big vested interest in this, not the only one in silicon valley or tech industries saying we need the best and brightest wherever they're from. it seems like a natural extension that he would be a part of this, that his initial foray into heavy politics would be im
that what mitt romney, while he was running was trying to sell white conservatives to african-americans when he spoke before the naacp. and i wanted to ask the congressman that somehow through this effort somehow white conservatives could relate to people of color. i doubt that him go-around would try to sell the idea of conservatives to -- black -- ervatives to guest: the conservative elements don't just stop with the whites or blacks or anyone. again, i think my main job so represent my constituents and in doing that, if i talk to everyone, i find that it's not so much about policies, philosophies, and theologies, it's trying to understand what people's problems are today and seeing if we can work our way through them, that to me seems to be more compelling than being in a philosophical drive. again, my district is 34% republicans so we have a broad base. i think one of the most important things we can do is balance out those voters in every district that 70% districts they are never going to have to work very hard. i have to work very hard, and frankly i like that. and i think that's what
the juicy earmarks are for special interests. want to know why mitt romney had to fiddle his taxes to get up to a 14% tax rate? which, by the way, is a lower tax rate than a solitary hospital orderly pays walking down the halls of rhode island hospital at night. how does he get it so he has to fiddle his taxes to get up to a rate lower than a hospital orderly pays? how do romney and the hedge fund billionaires pull that trick off? look here in alli babba's cave for the carried interest exception. do you want to know where exxonmobil, which is the richest and most profitable corporation in the history of the world, where exxonmobil gets its hands into the american taxpayers' pockets? look at the big oil subsidies in alli babba's cave. want to know how corporate jets get special favored tax treatment compared to the commercial jets that ordinary mortals fly? look at the accelerated depreciation schedules in ali baba's cave of tax tricks. if using the phrase, "left-wing manifesto" seems a little strident, a little exaggerated about a budget proposal for 50% spending cuts and 50% revenues and yo
challenges with respect to the economy and the budget. governor romney did the same thing. and both of them said the american people faced a very important and fundamental choice. and the american people chose. they chose to support president obama's vision of accelerating economic growth, putting more people back to work, taking a shared responsibility approach to our long-term deficits so we bring them down in a balanced smart way and they rejected the idea that we're going to move the economy forward by giving windfall tax cuts to the very wealthiest in the country and the benefits of that would trickle down and lift everybody up. they rejected that lopsided approach that balance the budgets on the backs of everybody but the folks at the very top. balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education by slashing important investments. in that category of spending we make these important investments for our country and our future, they double the cut from the sequester. so those are our investments in our kids' education. those are our investments in science and research to help power ou
of them from conservative states that voted for rick -- mitt romney. also, trying to stop the keystone pipeline, an amendment on carbon taxes and some amendments that republicans got done. things that dealt with climate change and other environmental issues. host: let's move on to the issue we brought you here, the house and senate this week approved legislation to keep the government funded through september, avoiding a shutdown by keeping in place the sequester. explain to us how the government funding will work under this bill. guest: the cr that was passed that heads to the president's desk, they are able to continue funding government passed march 27. it was a fine line they had to walk. republicans were not going to sign off on something but at the same time there were a number who were trying to get pieces of the sequester reinstated. as a result, he put together a , both that compromised sides working together. it leaves in place a lot of the other cuts, air traffic control towers are still going to see problems. other places where there could be furloughs, things like me inspe
, all the way back to lincoln, but today it seems to you have people -- mitt romney day 1 said that he would try to reverse it. in the history of the republican party the republicans have come up with great ideas and new things and people today want to undo that. guest: i appreciate that. what you point out is a fundamental lack of understanding of our own history relative to the things that we as trash or criticize fundamentally being oriented out of the philosophy of the party at that time. the referenced david bacon, talking about the emancipation proclamation, a radical departure from where the country was a the time. you talked about one of my favorites, affirmative action. a lot of republicans will trash that program in a heartbeat not recognizing that it was republicans who created affirmative action. richard nixon during his administration brought together african-american leaders within his administration to put in place a leveling field because he saw that black contractors were not getting a fair deal on federal contract in with their white counterparts. he wanted to create
rucker was white house correspondent for and he coveredt" the romney campaign and has been there since 2005. he also covered the obama transition. we talked about what was happening in colorado and what was signed into law there. the governor and other western democrats -- how important are they in terms of leading the charge to change the conversation about the gun control debate? guest: they are very important. western democrats have been some of the biggest defenders on gun rights that have not engaged a conversation on gun control measures. the fact that they are talking about it, and the governor of colorado has signed into law these measures is critical. it is not solely driven by people like joe biden and bloomberg and the northeastern establishment. they are trying to get geographical diversity. that is why joe manchin is a player. it also explains why the democrats in the senate have gone after tom coburn, a republican from oklahoma, who has been most open to a background check bill and he has been negotiating with chuck schumer from new york. it is not clear if he will actual
, push the party message and earn votes with ticket-topper mitt romney. then came last november. remys did hold on to the u.s. house of representatives and majority of gubernatorial seats among other win, yet given the fiery and sometimes ugly blame game, mr. priebus might have been wished for the days he was recognized as a rising star all while taking the republican party by storm. he's been working on campaigns since he was 16 and wound through the wisconsin republican party ranks and up to the rnc. he is proud to be a lifelong green pay packers fan. -- green bay packers fan. we're told he played a mean game of softball during his time working on his law degree at the university of miami. a time to reflect and look forward happens in any party that loses, but it doesn't lessen the sting when you're the recipient. mr. priebus has been working on a way to rally the faithful and plot a new strategy for the midterm election in 2014 and presidential contest in 2016. one of the silver linings which happened along the way is getting reelected as party chairman. to create a playbook for his
to play a little bit of governor mitt romney from cpac because he pointed out exactly that. let's listen. >> i would urge us all to learn lessons from come from some of our greatest success stories and that's 30 republican governors across the country. [applause] people like bob mcdonnell, scott walker, john kasich, suzanna martinez, chris christie, brian sandoval, these are the people we have to listen to and make sure their message is herd lout and clear across the country. martha: he said these are people we have to listen to. unfortunately you were not invited to the conference, governor. what do you think about that? >> that's fine. i spoken in the past a couple years. last year i spoke in washington and chicago at cpac. al cardenas is good friend. i spoke to the prayer brake fast on cpac on friday. and our candidate for governor, ken cuccinelli was the lead speaker. one governor is probably enough. no, look it's fine. i think bigger point we need to find a way to do, take the good, solid, conservative message, fiscal and conservative, demonstrate to people why it works. show that g
as mitt romney's etch a sketch did. yesterday when bloomberg was interviewed, he said that this was a way for him to educate people and in these red states where i live in south georgia, we don't need the education from michael bloomberg about our guns, rights to guns. most are in favor of some type of backgrund checks. in georgia, to have a carry permit, you have one. the devil is in the details. i'm not confident in eric holder and the department of justice to implement laws, new laws on the books when he won't even enforce the current gun laws on the books. >> so does patrick have something here that mayor bloomberg's reputation as a guy who runs a nanny state or tries to, does he really have any sway over people who are on the fence? >> this is a political red herring. oh, this week it's michael bloomberg and it used to be nancy pelosi and it used to be barack obama. you can use all the scary liberal names, but the reality on the ground, police who don't tend to vote democratic, even police are in favor of what the mayors are suggesting. michael bloomberg maying t be t face, but he's
's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. so what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the $600 billion tax increase that obama won in january and the trillion dollars of obamacare tax increases that most americans are unaware of, they don't know that they're hitting, they haven't gotten
the romney campaign and has been there since 2005. he also covered the obama transition. wasalked about what happening in colorado and what was signed into law there. the governor and other western democrats -- how important are they in terms of leading the charge to change the conversation about the gun control debate? guest: they are very important. western democrats have been some of the biggest defenders on gun rights that have not engaged a conversation on gun control measures. the fact that they are talking about it, and the governor of colorado has signed into law these measures is critical. it is not solely driven by people like joe biden and bloomberg and the northeastern establishment. they are trying to get geographical diversity. that is why joe manchin is a player. thelso explains why democrats in the senate have gone after tom coburn, a republican from oklahoma, who has been most open to a background check bill and he has been negotiating with chuck schumer from new york. it is not clear if he will actually end up supporting what comes to the floor from senator reed in a couple
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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